Research
Three streams of research
Salient

Learning for Work: DEVELOPING NEW EXPERTISE

The Learning As Behaviors (LABS) Model of Expertise Development integrates research from management, cognitive psychology, educational psychology and neuroscience to describe the process of how a novice achieves expertise. Defining expertise as the ability to perform in novel situations, the model provides intermediate stages of expertise along with the learning behaviors that culminate in that ability.

Research Aims
This research is targeted at refining and testing the model. First, I seek to validate the sequential nature of the model. Must the behaviors happen in order; and in this order? Second, I will explore whether each behavior is necessary for expertise development or if some lesser combination of behaviors is adequate. Third, I seek to empirically determine the situational conditions and individual differences that drive each learning behavior.

Learning from Work: LEARNING AGILITY

Learning agility is gaining traction as a key competency in dynamic business environments. It has been defined "ability to come up to speed quickly in one’s understanding of a situation and move across ideas flexibly in service of learning both within and across experiences" (DeRue et al., 2012 p262).

Research Aims
This research in both field and experimental settings is targeted at examining whether and how employees in the 'midst of learning' are aware of the optimal learning behavior as well as determining if this awareness does indeed increase learning agility. Further, the role of reflection is both critically important and understudied. Therefore, this research is also aimed at delineating a taxonomy of the types and outcomes of effective reflection within the learning process.

Working to Learn: CRITICAL REFLECTION

One of the most difficult transitions in developing expertise is moving from being highly competent to being an expert. The difference lies in the ability to adapt to novel situations within the domain of expertise.

Research Aims
This research aims to examine the role of critical reflection in the ability of top performers to adapt. Specifically, which top performers are likely to critically reflect, and under what conditions do they feel supported in doing so?
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Learning Agility
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Critical reflection

By three methods we may learn wisdom: First, by reflection, which is noblest; Second, by imitation, which is easiest; and third by experience, which is the bitterest. – Confucius

email

mrigolizzo@hbs.edu

Address

Harvard Business School
Harvard Business School
Boston, MA
Boston, Massachusetts
USA
USA

Hours

Academic
Academic